Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Awareness Day

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A woman at an event for missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls.

CHEYENNE– A proclamation recognizing May 5, 2018 as Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Awareness Day was signed by Chairman Clint Wagon of the Eastern Shoshone Business Council and Roy Brown of the Northern Arapaho Business Council.

The proclamation was distributed across the State. Governor Matt Mead joins the Chairmen of the Tribes recognizing the importance of raising public awareness of this critical issue.

Facts About Violence Toward Indigenous Women

The Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls Awareness Day proclamation states the following:

  • There is not a comprehensible estimate of how many Indigenous women are missing and murdered in the United States, as many victims come from under-served communities, or their disappearances or murders go unreported, resulting in systemic failure.
  • Nearly half of all Native American women in the U.S. have been raped, beaten, or stalked by an intimate partner.
  • Native American women are 2.5 times more likely to experience sexual assault.
  • One in three Native American women will be raped in her lifetime.
  • On some reservations, women are murdered at a rate 10 times higher than the national average.
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The Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapaho Tribes seek to build support by increasing awareness within their communities and in the United States year round.